This website uses cookies in order to collect usage information and show advertisements based on your personal preferences.

Accept cookies More info

Crimes and Misdemeanors 1989

Critics score:
93 / 100

Reviews provided by RottenTomatoes

Vincent Canby, New York Times: The movie's secret strength -- its structure, really -- comes from the truth of the dozens and dozens of particular details through which it arrives at its own very hesitant, not especially comforting, very moving generality. Read more

Jonathan Rosenbaum, Chicago Reader: The overall 'philosophical' thrust -- that good guys finish last and that crime does pay -- is designed to make the audience feel very wise, but none of the characters or ideas is allowed to develop beyond its cardboard profile. Read more

Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times: The movie generates the best kind of suspense, because it's not about what will happen to people -- it's about what decisions they will reach. Read more

Geoff Andrew, Time Out: Dramatically, the film seldom fulfils its promise, and its pessimistic 'moral' -- that good and evil do not always meet with their just deserts -- looks contrived and hollow. Intriguing and patchily effective, nevertheless. Read more

Variety Staff, Variety: The structural and stylistic conceit is that when Landau is onscreen, the film is dead serious, even solemn, while Allen's own appearance onscreen signals hilarious satire and priceless one-liners. Read more

Rita Kempley, Washington Post: A relative of Hannah and Her Sisters in its duplex structure and of The Purple Rose of Cairo in its bitter theme, Crimes is two movies in one, a blend of Allen's satiric and pretentious dramatic styles. Read more